•  

    Bourgogne

    Appellation Régionale

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 1854 ha 93 a.

     

     

    origin

     

    Pinot Noir originates from the first wild vines selected by mankind. It was probably cultivated in Gaul before the Roman invasion. Its presence is recorded in Burgundy during the  4th century after Jesus Christ. “Pinot Vermeil” is mentioned in the region’s hospital register dating back to 1375. It is the only grape variety, maintaining the same name for so many centuries. More of a homebody than a traveller, it symbolizes the almost mythical relationship between a grape variety and its terroir. Original and capricious, it is sensitive to the slightest variations in terms of soil. Contrary to other varieties, that have adapted to other locations, Pinot Noir remains loyal to Burgundy, its region of origin. It provides an extraordinary variety of expressions as it is present within all of the Jurassic zones – marls from the Lias era in Maranges, marly-limestone soils in Pommard and Volnay, crinoidal limestone in Gevrey-Chambertin or limestone in Premeux. Thanks to their selection of the best vines, generations of growers have made Burgundy a unique vineyard by perfectly matching the grape variety, with the terroirs and climates.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Regional Appellations are wines that can be made out of a blend of several locations, recognized within the appellation area. Wine merchant-maturer is a special profession, involving the careful selection of the best parcels for winemaking, according to the vintage.

    When it comes to our Bourgogne Rouge, we have selected parcels in Côte Chalonnaise, just next to Givry, in Côte de Beaune, near Volnay and in Côte de Nuits, close to Premeaux-Prissey.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Bourgogne Hautes-Côtes-de-Beaune

    Appellation Régionale

    Lieu-dit Au Crêtot

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 663 ha 68 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    From Maranges to Ladoix-Serrigny, the Hautes-Côtes de Beaune are found at the highest point to the West of the Côte de Beaune. Planted on a plateau at an altitude of between 280 and 450 metres, they offer a varied landscape alternating between vales and fells.

    Crêtot may be connected to Crots or Crotots describing a sunken piece of land.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is made from vines with an average age of 35 years old, located in Bouze-les-Beaune. Facing North-West and at altitude of 400 metres, they are planted in a soil, comprising so-called Nantoux limestone.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

  •  

    Ladoix

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 74 ha 84 a.

    Locality named: 8 ha 11 a 39 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village is the first of the Côte de Beaune when coming from Dijon. It has three hamlets: Buisson, Neuvelle and Corcelles. Named La Doiz de Sarrigny in 1304, it is undoubtedly one of the oldest of the Côte d’Or and also one of the largest, judging by the number of Merovingian objects found here.

    Ladoix comes from douix, which means spring or fountain. This can be explained by the Lauve, a spring found at the foot of the Corton hillside. Serrigny, whose name is said to come from a Gallo-Roman, was linked to Ladoix in 1988.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 40-year-old vines, located at the foot of Mount Corton. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 235 to 240 metres, they are planted in a heavy clay soil, ladden with chailles limestone.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Santenay

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 170 ha 88 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Divided into four inhabited areas, Santenay-le-Haut, Santenay-le-Bas, La Crée and Saint-Jean, the village gives an exceptional panoramic view over the Mont de Sène, also called the Mountain of Three Crosses. Its XIIIth century church, St Jean of Narosse, is reputed for its Romanesque style architecture. Since 1968, the main activities in Santenay are balneology and viticulture.

    Named Sentennacus in 858, it appears that Santenay takes its name from a figure of Ancient Rome called Sentius or a derivative of the word sanctus, a sacred place during the pre-Christian era.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, located in two different parcels within the district of Santenay. The first one is situated in the upper part of the district called Les Bras, at an altitude of 360 to 450 metres, facing South and South-East, with an altered soil, comprising ostrea acuminata marls. The second one is situated in the lower part of the district Les Saunières at an altitude of 250 to 265 metres, facing East, with a soil made up of de-carbonated silt, resulting from the alteration of ancient colluvial deposits.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

  •  

    Marsannay

    Appellation Village

    Lieu-dit Les Longeroies

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 171 ha 26 a.

    Localitiy named: 34 ha 12 a 03 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village of Marsannay is considered as the “Golden Gateway to the Côte de Nuits”. The presence of vines here can be confirmed as of the VIIth century. The Abbey of Bèze, in the diocese of Autun and the Dukes of Burgundy owned vines here.

    The name Marsannay comes from Marcenniacus in 630 and from Marcennai en Montagne in 1375. It was certainly from the Gallo-Roman surname Marcenius or a Celtic word for marshland (marécage in French).

    Longeroies comes from “longe” or “long and narrow” and from “roie” meaning furrow. This therefore talks about a long, narrow plot of vines.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is derived from vines situated in Marsannay-La-Côte within the districts called Les Longeroies Dessus and Les Longeroies Dessus Bas. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 270 to 300 metres, they are planted in a fine brown clay soil, laden with stones (limestone and chailles), resulting from altered underlying limestone from Premaux in the upper part. In the lower part, the soil represents a layer of 50 to 70 centimetres, resting upon limestone laden marl and stony alluvial deposits, abandoned by the Ouche River, back when it passed through Marsannay-La-Côte.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Gevrey-Chambertin

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 322 ha 20 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambertin takes its name from a Burgonde who owned a field adjoining the Clos-de-Bèze: the property took the name of Chambertin. The winegrower was gifted and his wine excellent. Everybody spoke about the “Champs de Bertin” (Bertin’s Field) to refer to his vineyard. In the 13th century, Chambertin became a word used frequently in everyday language.

    In 1847, the name Chambertin was associated with that of Gevrey by a law ruled by King Louis-Philippe.

    Gevrey undoubtedly takes its name from its topography, a gorge coming out of a valley. Gorge comes from the word gaba in Latin and gave means a torrent rushing down a gorge.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines situated within the district of Gevrey-Chambertin. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 220 metres, they are planted in a very well draining pebble laden soil, produced by altered alluvial cone deposits, from the outlet of Combe de Lavaux.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Morey-Saint-Denis

    Appellation Village

    Lieu-dit Clos Solon

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 68 ha 39 a.

    Locality named: 5 ha 57 a 91 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    There were numerous abbeys in Morey and its surrounding area. Located in the Hautes Côtes, a few kilometres to the west of the village, the Abbey of Vergy founded the religious Chapter of Saint-Denis in 1203. The relics of the saint are kept here. The monks built a cellar in the centre of Morey.

    Morey takes its name from a Gallo-Roman named Mirrius, which became Mirriacus.

    Clos Solon certainly comes from the surname of an owner.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines situated in the locality of Morey-Saint-Denis in the district called Clos Solon. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 255 to 260 metres, they are planted in a 50-cm deep sandy-clay soil from the alluvial cone deposits at the outlet of Combe de Lavaux with a crinoidal limestone subsoil from the Bajocian era.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Vosne-Romanée

    Appellation Village

    Lieu-dit Les Chalandins

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 94 ha 72 a.

    Locality named: 4 ha 39 a 95 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Vosne-Romanée enjoys exceptional renown, thanks to the wealth of history attached to this place. Monks who settled in Cîteaux in 1098 owned prestigious climats located in the area around the village. The cellar of Clos de Vougeot is in close proximity. The Dukes of Burgundy had a meeting place for hunting located in Vosne. In 1760, Louis-Ferdinand de Bourbon purchased La Romanée, which was to produce the legendary wine Romanée-Conti. In 1866, an Imperial decree issued by Napoleon III authorised the wine-producing villages of the Côte to join their name to that of the greatest growth of the jurisdiction. Vosne therefore naturally became Vosne-Romanée.

    It seems that Vosne takes its name from a derivative of vidumos, a Gallic word meaning forests.

    The origin of Chalandins has not yet been found.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from a vine situated in the locality of Flagey-Echezeaux within the district called Les Chalandins – a neighbor of the lower part of Grand Cru Clos de Vougeot. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 245 metres, they are planted in a deep clay-silt soil on marls from Bresse.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Volnay

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 87 ha 46 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village is perched, narrow and steep on the Côte de Beaune. Standing against the Montagne du Chaignot, it outlines a slight bend which stretches from the East to South-East. For centuries its renown has been established by Knights of the Order of Malta, monks of the Abbeys of Saint-Andoche d’Autun and Maizières, dukes and kings.

    Volnay was called Volenay in 1160. It seems that the name comes from a Latin surname Volumnius, but it could also have a Celtic origin with the word vol, which alludes to the idea of round, the village being situated in fact in a corrie.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are between 15 and 50 years old, situated in Volnay in the locallity named Les Lurets and Les Cros Martin, under the Premiers Crus area. Facing East/South- East and at an altitude between 225 and 235 metres, they are planted on brown soil made of sediments overlying Jurassic limestone.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Maranges Premier Cru

    Climat Le Croix Moines

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 81 ha 98 a.

    The climat: 1 ha 02 a 50 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Three villages, Cheilly-lès-Maranges, Dezize-lès-Maranges and Sampigny-lès-Maranges assert the Maranges appellation. This makes a link between the Côte-d’Or and the Saône-et-Loire.

     

    Le Croix may mean “a crossroads” or “crossed”

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 70-year-old vines, situated in the locality of Dezize-lès-Maranges, and South of the climate known as La Fussière. Facing South, at an altitude of 370 metres and on a steep slope, ranging from 11 to 26 %, they are planted in a soil of altered scree of crinoidal limestone with whole segments of cliffs, on blue and black marls, guiding the circulation of ground water.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Santenay Premier Cru

    Climat La Comme

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 109 ha 69 a.

    The climat: 21 ha 61 a 11 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Divided into four inhabited areas, Santenay-le-Haut, Santenay-le-Bas, La Crée and Saint-Jean, the village gives an exceptional panoramic view over the Mont de Sène, also called the Mountain of Three Crosses. Its XIIIth century church, St Jean of Narosse, is reputed for its Romanesque style architecture. Since 1968, the main activities in Santenay are balneology and viticulture.

    Named Sentennacus in 858, it appears that Santenay takes its name from a figure of Ancient Rome called Sentius or a derivative of the word sanctus, a sacred place during the pre-Christian era.

     

    La Comme is the name in Burgundy that refers to the valley.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 70-year-old vines, situated North of the locality of Santenay within the climate called La Comme. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 250 to 300 metres, they are planted in a brown gravelly limestone soil, filled with stones from altered Chassagne limestone. Erosion-resistant, this limestone produces fine, stony soils.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Santenay Premier Cru

    Climat Clos Rousseau

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 109 ha 69 a.

    The climat: 15 ha 90 a 29 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Santenay is a very old village. Its name is mentioned in the liturgical books of Our Lady of Beaune in 1271 and 1289. Philippe Le Hardi owned a fortified house here in 1376, which became the property of Guillaume de Villersin in 1470. In reality, there were three fortified houses here during the 15th century, “one in Crée, one in Norosse and one in the village itself”. At present, Santenay is split up into four residential zones, Santenay-le-Haut, Santenay-le-Bas, La Crée and Saint-Jean.

    Named Sentennacus in 858, it appears that Santenay takes its name from a figure of Ancient Rome called Sentius or a derivative of the word sanctus, a sacred place during the pre-Christian era.

    Clos Rousseau certainly comes from Roussot, the surname of an owner.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is made from 70-year-old vines, situated in Santenay in the climate of Clos Rousseau. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 270 to 320 metres, they are planted in a red clay-loam soil, out of altered limestone from the Middle Jurassic period.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Beaune Premier Cru

    Climat Les Avaux

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 277 ha 74 a.

    The climat: 11 ha 92 a 23 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Located in the heart of the winegrowing area, Beaune is indisputably its capital. It is home to centuries of history with treasures of architecture and art, among which the 15th century Hôtel-Dieu is the jewel in the crown. Almost all of the underground area in the city is a labyrinth of underground cellars.

    It seems that the name Beaune comes from Belenos, the Gallic god considered as being similar to the Greek god Apollo by the Romans. The locality must have been a place of worship to this god. Belenos also means shining and Beaune would then come close to a hydronym: clean (water).

    Les Avaux comes from val, which comes from the Latin word vallis to refer to a small or large dip or hollow.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is derived from 45-year-old vines, situated in Beaune in the climate called Les Avaux. Facing East and at an altitude of 240 metres, they are planted in a deep clay soil, with a Jurassic limestone substrate.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Beaune Premier Cru

    Climat Aux Cras

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 277 ha 74 a.

    The climat: 4 ha 99 a 61 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Located in the heart of the winegrowing area, Beaune is indisputably its capital. It is home to centuries of history with treasures of architecture and art, among which the 15th century Hôtel-Dieu is the jewel in the crown. Almost all of the underground area in the city is a labyrinth of underground cellars.

    It seems that the name Beaune comes from Belenos, the Gallic god considered as being similar to the Greek god Apollo by the Romans. The locality must have been a place of worship to this god. Belenos also means shining and Beaune would then come close to a hydronym: clean (water).

    Les Cras comes from the medieval word crai which means stony land.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 80-year-old vines, located in Beaune within the climate called Aux Cras. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 250 to 300 metres, they are planted in a shallow soil made up of brown limestone, out of altered Ladoix limestone, splitting into 2-cm thick chips, filled with pieces of shells.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Volnay Premier Cru

    Climat Les Lurets

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 132 ha 54 a.

    The climat: 2 ha 07 a 15 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village is perched on Côte de Beaune. The 14th century church is dedicated to Saint Cyr, one of the youngest christian martyrs, who has since become the patron of the district’s winegrowers.

    Volnay was called Volenay in 1160. It seems that the name comes from a Latin surname Volumnius, but it could also have a Celtic origin with the word vol, which alludes to the idea of round, the village being situated in fact in a corrie.

    Lurets may come from the word larrey stemming from the Latin word latus, which means side of a hill-mountain or slope

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are between 15 and 50 years old, situated South of Volnay in the climate called Les Lurets. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 235 to 240 metres, they are planted in well drained stony soil.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Nuits-Saint-Georges premier Cru

    Climat Aux Boudots

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 136 ha 32 a.

    The climat: 6 ha 30 a 18 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Gui Crescent Fagon was the Sun King’s doctor. In fact, to cure his royal patient of gout, he recommended that Louis XIV drink only red wine from “Vieux Nuits”. The king’s health improved and the renown of Nuits-Saint-Georges continued to flourish.

    Nuits comes from Nuis, which appears to be a surname.

    The name Saint-Georges comes from the IVth century, when it is reported that Philibert de Mollans brought back to Nuits the relics of Georges de Lydda, a Christian martyr. Saint Georges became a patron saint of Burgundy.

    The climat Aux Boudots, located on the slope that joins Nuits-Saint-Georges to Vosne-Romanée, is close to the Premiers Crus of Vosne.It seems that Aux Boudots came from the surname of a well-known owner.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, situated in the northern part of the Nuits-Saint-Georges appellation area at the heart of the climate called Aux Boudots, next to Vosne-Romanée. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 255 to 290 metres, they are planted in a well draining brown calcareous clay soil of colluvial origin, derived from altered limestone scree, comprising sharp-edged gravel from Comblanchien limestones.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Gevrey-Chambertin premier Cru

    Climat Lavaut-Saint-Jacques

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 80 ha 52 a.

    The climat: 9 ha 53 a 03 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Winegrowing in Gevrey-Chambertin dates back to Gallo-Roman times as bear witness the many discovered relics. Wine festivals have been held here since the 18th century.

    The name of Chambertin was associated with that of Gevrey in 1847 by a ruling of the king Louis-Philippe.

    It was one of the first villages to sell bottled wines at the beginning of the 1930s.

    Gevrey undoubtedly takes its name from its topography, a gorge coming out of a valley. Gorge comes from the word gaba in Latin and gave means a torrent rushing down a gorge.

    Lavaut takes its name from its location, at the entry of Combe Lavaut. Lavaut comes from La Val, which means dip or hollow. As this climat adjoins Le Clos Saint-Jacques, it chose Saint-Jacques to complete its name.

    The cadastral survey in 1828 showed that the climate included 133 parcels, belonging to 74 estates. The smallest ones represented a mere 25 m2.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are about 50 years old, located in Gevrey-Chambertin in the climate called, Lavaut Saint-Jacques. Facing South/Southeast and at an altitude of 290 to 325 metres, they are planted in a soil, made up of brown limestone, derived from altered chalky-clay and limestone from Premeaux.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Chambolle-Musigny premier Cru

    Climat Aux Échanges

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 55 ha 40 a.

    The climat: 92 a 60 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambolle was an oppidum (a Latin word meaning a fortified town) on the mountain of Grognot, where prehistoric settlement sites were found, revealing numerous pieces of pottery and remaining vestiges of an outer wall. The history of the village is significantly linked to lay-people who worked in the neighbouring abbeys. The village’s expansion occurred when these people decided to settle permanently here. During the XVIth century, Chambolle was part of the monastic jurisdiction of Gilly-les-Cîteaux.

    Chambolle takes its name from the stream named Le Grône, which bubbled loudly after heavy rainfall, hence the term Campus Ebulliens or Champ Bouillant (meaning bubbling field), then mentioned as Chambola in the XIIth century and Cambula during the XIVth century.Musigny comes from Musinus, a Gallo-Roman owner.

    It appears that the climat Aux Échanges takes its name from a donation given to the Abbey of Cîteaux, Es Echange, of 12 small plots of land (known in French as ouvrées each one measuring 4.28 acres).

     

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, located next to the locality of Aloxe-Corton on top of Mount Corton. Facing South-East, at an altitude of 280 to 320 metres, they are planted in a brown limestone soil, derived from altered limestone from Ladoix, splitting into 2-cm thick chips, previously used as so-called “lava” tiles on traditional Burgundy roofs.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Corton Le Clos du Roi Grand Cru

     

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 91 ha 53 a.

    The climat: 10 ha 72 a 70 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The Côte de Beaune begins with the Montagne de Corton.

    Corton comes from the Gallo-Roman period where a rural estate named Curtis was perpetuated by the Franks and subsequently by the monks of Cîteaux.

    Clos du Roi comes from the XVIIIth century, with the French monarchy’s control of wine estates belonging to the Dukes of Burgundy, after the demise of the Téméraire.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, located next to the locality of Aloxe-Corton on top of Mount Corton. Facing South-East, at an altitude of 280 to 320 metres, they are planted in a brown limestone soil, derived from altered limestone from Ladoix, splitting into 2-cm thick chips, previously used as so-called “lava” tiles on traditional Burgundy roofs.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Charmes-Chambertin Grand Cru

     

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 28 ha 43 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambertin takes its name from a Burgonde who owned a field adjoining Clos-de-Bèze: the property took the name Chambertin. The winegrower was gifted and his wine excellent. Everyone spoke about the “Champs de Bertin” (Bertin’s field) when talking about his vineyard. In the XIIIth century, the name Chambertin became a word used frequently in everyday language.

    Charmes comes from a pre-Latin word, calma that became charme, chaux and chaume during the Gallo-Roman and Frank period. In a text written during the XIXth century, the term “friche des charmes” (friche meaning an uncultivated field) was found, hence the name of this climat.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are about 50 years old, situated in the locality of Gevrey-Chambertin in the climate called Charmes-Chambertin. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 250 metres, they are planted in a fine brown limestone soil, out of crinoidal limestone.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Clos de Vougeot Grand Cru

    Climat Le Petit Maupertuis

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 49 ha 13 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Vougeot owes its renown to the monks of Cîteaux, who came here to establish their production buildings in 1167. The famous Clos-de-Vougeot houses the historical cellar of these Cistercian monks. The mansion was built later, during the Renaissance period. Today it hosts the well-known Wine Brotherhood, the Chevaliers du Tastevin and its ceremonial events.

    Vougeot is the dialectal diminutive of the Vouge, the small river whose source is found in the village and crosses it. It appears that Vouge comes from the Celtic word vidubium which refers to a billhook, or from vidu which means forest.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are around 50 years old, situated in the locality of Vougeot, within the climate of Le Petit Maupertuis. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 255 metres, they are planted in a spot where the soil is gravel-laden and quite shallow (about 40 centimetres).

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Chambertin Grand Cru

     

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 13 ha 62 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambertin takes its name from a Burgonde who owned a field adjoining the Clos-de-Bèze: the property took the name of Chambertin. The winegrower was gifted and his wine excellent. Everybody spoke about the “Champs de Bertin” (Bertin’s Field) to refer to his vineyard. In the XIIIth century, Chambertin became a word used frequently in everyday language.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, situated in the locality of Gevrey-Chambertin in the climate called Chambertin. Facing South-East, at an altitude of 270 metres, they are planted in a soil made up of brown limestone, out of altered crinoidal limestone in the lower part of the parcel and ostrea acuminata marls.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

 

Camille Giroud • 3 Rue Pierre Joigneaux, 21200 Beaune

 

T. 03 80 22 12 65 • contact@camillegiroud.com

 

l'abus d'alcool est dangereux pour la santé.

Sachez apprécier et consommer avec modération

 

 

Camille Giroud • 3 Rue Pierre Joigneaux, 21200 Beaune

 

T. 03 80 22 12 65 • contact@camillegiroud.com

 

l'abus d'alcool est dangereux pour la santé.

Sachez apprécier et consommer avec modération

 

Legal notices • Credits

 

 

Red wines

FR

———

ENG

  •  

    Bourgogne

    Appellation Régionale

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 1854 ha 93 a.

     

     

    origin

     

    Pinot Noir originates from the first wild vines selected by mankind. It was probably cultivated in Gaul before the Roman invasion. Its presence is recorded in Burgundy during the 4th century after Jesus Christ. “Pinot Vermeil” is mentioned in the region’s hospital register dating back to 1375. It is the only grape variety, maintaining the same name for so many centuries. More of a homebody than a traveller, it symbolizes the almost mythical relationship between a grape variety and its terroir. Original and capricious, it is sensitive to the slightest variations in terms of soil. Contrary to other varieties, that have adapted to other locations, Pinot Noir remains loyal to Burgundy, its region of origin. It provides an extraordinary variety of expressions as it is present within all of the Jurassic zones – marls from the Lias era in Maranges, marly-limestone soils in Pommard and Volnay, crinoidal limestone in Gevrey-Chambertin or limestone in Premeux. Thanks to their selection of the best vines, generations of growers have made Burgundy a unique vineyard by perfectly matching the grape variety, with the terroirs and climates.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Regional Appellations are wines that can be made out of a blend of several locations, recognized within the appellation area. Wine merchant-maturer is a special profession, involving the careful selection of the best parcels for winemaking, according to the vintage.

    When it comes to our Bourgogne Rouge, we have selected parcels in Côte Chalonnaise, just next to Givry, in Côte de Beaune, near Volnay and in Côte de Nuits, close to Premeaux-Prissey.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Bourgogne

    Hautes-Côtes-de-Beaune

    Appellation Régionale

    Lieu-dit Au Crêtot

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 663 ha 68 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    From Maranges to Ladoix-Serrigny, the Hautes-Côtes de Beaune are found at the highest point to the West of the Côte de Beaune. Planted on a plateau at an altitude of between 280 and 450 metres, they offer a varied landscape alternating between vales and fells.

    Crêtot may be connected to Crots or Crotots describing a sunken piece of land.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is made from vines with an average age of 35 years old, located in Bouze-les-Beaune. Facing North-West and at altitude of 400 metres, they are planted in a soil, comprising so-called Nantoux limestone.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Ladoix

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 74 ha 84 a.

    Locality named: 8 ha 11 a 39 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village is the first of the Côte de Beaune when coming from Dijon. It has three hamlets: Buisson, Neuvelle and Corcelles. Named La Doiz de Sarrigny in 1304, it is undoubtedly one of the oldest of the Côte d’Or and also one of the largest, judging by the number of Merovingian objects found here.

    Ladoix comes from douix, which means spring or fountain. This can be explained by the Lauve, a spring found at the foot of the Corton hillside. Serrigny, whose name is said to come from a Gallo-Roman, was linked to Ladoix in 1988.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 40-year-old vines, located at the foot of Mount Corton. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 235 to 240 metres, they are planted in a heavy clay soil, ladden with chailles limestone.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Santenay

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation:

    170 ha 88 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Divided into four inhabited areas, Santenay-le-Haut, Santenay-le-Bas, La Crée and Saint-Jean, the village gives an exceptional panoramic view over the Mont de Sène, also called the Mountain of Three Crosses. Its XIIIth century church, St Jean of Narosse, is reputed for its Romanesque style architecture. Since 1968, the main activities in Santenay are balneology and viticulture.

    Named Sentennacus in 858, it appears that Santenay takes its name from a figure of Ancient Rome called Sentius or a derivative of the word sanctus, a sacred place during the pre-Christian era.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, located in two different parcels within the district of Santenay. The first one is situated in the upper part of the district called Les Bras, at an altitude of 360 to 450 metres, facing South and South-East, with an altered soil, comprising ostrea acuminata marls. The second one is situated in the lower part of the district Les Saunières at an altitude of 250 to 265 metres, facing East, with a soil made up of de-carbonated silt, resulting from the alteration of ancient colluvial deposits.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Marsannay

    Appellation Village

    Lieu-dit Les Longeroies

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 171 ha 26 a.

    Localitiy named: 34 ha 12 a 03 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village of Marsannay is considered as the “Golden Gateway to the Côte de Nuits”. The presence of vines here can be confirmed as of the VIIth century. The Abbey of Bèze, in the diocese of Autun and the Dukes of Burgundy owned vines here.

    The name Marsannay comes from Marcenniacus in 630 and from Marcennai en Montagne in 1375. It was certainly from the Gallo-Roman surname Marcenius or a Celtic word for marshland (marécage in French).Longeroies comes from “longe” or “long and narrow” and from “roie” meaning furrow. This therefore talks about a long, narrow plot of vines.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is derived from vines situated in Marsannay-La-Côte within the districts called Les Longeroies Dessus and Les Longeroies Dessus Bas. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 270 to 300 metres, they are planted in a fine brown clay soil, laden with stones (limestone and chailles), resulting from altered underlying limestone from Premaux in the upper part. In the lower part, the soil represents a layer of 50 to 70 centimetres, resting upon limestone laden marl and stony alluvial deposits, abandoned by the Ouche River, back when it passed through Marsannay-La-Côte.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Gevrey-Chambertin

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 322 ha 20 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambertin takes its name from a Burgonde who owned a field adjoining the Clos-de-Bèze: the property took the name of Chambertin. The winegrower was gifted and his wine excellent. Everybody spoke about the “Champs de Bertin” (Bertin’s Field) to refer to his vineyard. In the 13th century, Chambertin became a word used frequently in everyday language.

    In 1847, the name Chambertin was associated with that of Gevrey by a law ruled by King Louis-Philippe.

    Gevrey undoubtedly takes its name from its topography, a gorge coming out of a valley. Gorge comes from the word gaba in Latin and gave means a torrent rushing down a gorge.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines situated within the district of Gevrey-Chambertin. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 220 metres, they are planted in a very well draining pebble laden soil, produced by altered alluvial cone deposits, from the outlet of Combe de Lavaux.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Morey-Saint-Denis

    Appellation Village

    Lieu-dit Clos Solon

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 68 ha 39 a.

    Locality named: 5 ha 57 a 91 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    There were numerous abbeys in Morey and its surrounding area. Located in the Hautes Côtes, a few kilometres to the west of the village, the Abbey of Vergy founded the religious Chapter of Saint-Denis in 1203. The relics of the saint are kept here. The monks built a cellar in the centre of Morey.Morey takes its name from a Gallo-Roman named Mirrius, which became Mirriacus.

    Clos Solon certainly comes from the surname of an owner.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines situated in the locality of Morey-Saint-Denis in the district called Clos Solon. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 255 to 260 metres, they are planted in a 50-cm deep sandy-clay soil from the alluvial cone deposits at the outlet of Combe de Lavaux with a crinoidal limestone subsoil from the Bajocian era.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Vosne-Romanée

    Appellation Village

    Lieu-dit Les Chalandins

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 94 ha 72 a.

    Locality named: 4 ha 39 a 95 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Vosne-Romanée enjoys exceptional renown, thanks to the wealth of history attached to this place. Monks who settled in Cîteaux in 1098 owned prestigious climats located in the area around the village. The cellar of Clos de Vougeot is in close proximity. The Dukes of Burgundy had a meeting place for hunting located in Vosne. In 1760, Louis-Ferdinand de Bourbon purchased La Romanée, which was to produce the legendary wine Romanée-Conti. In 1866, an Imperial decree issued by Napoleon III authorised the wine-producing villages of the Côte to join their name to that of the greatest growth of the jurisdiction. Vosne therefore naturally became Vosne-Romanée.

    It seems that Vosne takes its name from a derivative of vidumos, a Gallic word meaning forests.

    The origin of Chalandins has not yet been found.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from a vine situated in the locality of Flagey-Echezeaux within the district called Les Chalandins – a neighbor of the lower part of Grand Cru Clos de Vougeot. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 245 metres, they are planted in a deep clay-silt soil on marls from Bresse.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Volnay

    Appellation Village

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 87 ha 46 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village is perched, narrow and steep on the Côte de Beaune. Standing against the Montagne du Chaignot, it outlines a slight bend which stretches from the East to South-East. For centuries its renown has been established by Knights of the Order of Malta, monks of the Abbeys of Saint-Andoche d’Autun and Maizières, dukes and kings.

    Volnay was called Volenay in 1160. It seems that the name comes from a Latin surname Volumnius, but it could also have a Celtic origin with the word vol, which alludes to the idea of round, the village being situated in fact in a corrie.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are between 15 and 50 years old, situated in Volnay in the locallity named Les Lurets and Les Cros Martin, under the Premiers Crus area. Facing East/South- East and at an altitude between 225 and 235 metres, they are planted on brown soil made of sediments overlying Jurassic limestone.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Maranges Premier Cru

    Climat Le Croix Moines

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 81 ha 98 a.

    The climat : 1 ha 02 a 50 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Three villages, Cheilly-lès-Maranges, Dezize-lès-Maranges and Sampigny-lès-Maranges assert the Maranges appellation. This makes a link between the Côte-d’Or and the Saône-et-Loire.

    Le Croix may mean “a crossroads” or “crossed”

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 70-year-old vines, situated in the locality of Dezize-lès-Maranges, and South of the climate known as La Fussière. Facing South, at an altitude of 370 metres and on a steep slope, ranging from 11 to 26 %, they are planted in a soil of altered scree of crinoidal limestone with whole segments of cliffs, on blue and black marls, guiding the circulation of ground water.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Santenay Premier Cru

    Climat La Comme

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation:

    109 ha 69 a.

    The climat: 21 ha 61 a 11 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Divided into four inhabited areas, Santenay-le-Haut, Santenay-le-Bas, La Crée and Saint-Jean, the village gives an exceptional panoramic view over the Mont de Sène, also called the Mountain of Three Crosses. Its XIIIth century church, St Jean of Narosse, is reputed for its Romanesque style architecture. Since 1968, the main activities in Santenay are balneology and viticulture.

    Named Sentennacus in 858, it appears that Santenay takes its name from a figure of Ancient Rome called Sentius or a derivative of the word sanctus, a sacred place during the pre-Christian era.

     

    La Comme is the name in Burgundy that refers to the valley.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 70-year-old vines, situated North of the locality of Santenay within the climate called La Comme. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 250 to 300 metres, they are planted in a brown gravelly limestone soil, filled with stones from altered Chassagne limestone. Erosion-resistant, this limestone produces fine, stony soils.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Santenay Premier Cru

    Climat Clos Rousseau

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 109 ha 69 a.

    The climat: 15 ha 90 a 29 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Santenay is a very old village. Its name is mentioned in the liturgical books of Our Lady of Beaune in 1271 and 1289. Philippe Le Hardi owned a fortified house here in 1376, which became the property of Guillaume de Villersin in 1470. In reality, there were three fortified houses here during the 15th century, “one in Crée, one in Norosse and one in the village itself”. At present, Santenay is split up into four residential zones, Santenay-le-Haut, Santenay-le-Bas, La Crée and Saint-Jean.

    Named Sentennacus in 858, it appears that Santenay takes its name from a figure of Ancient Rome called Sentius or a derivative of the word sanctus, a sacred place during the pre-Christian era.

    Clos Rousseau certainly comes from Roussot, the surname of an owner.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is made from 70-year-old vines, situated in Santenay in the climate of Clos Rousseau. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 270 to 320 metres, they are planted in a red clay-loam soil, out of altered limestone from the Middle Jurassic period.

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Beaune Premier Cru

    Climat Les Avaux

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 277 ha 74 a.

    The climat: 11 ha 92 a 23 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Located in the heart of the winegrowing area, Beaune is indisputably its capital. It is home to centuries of history with treasures of architecture and art, among which the 15th century Hôtel-Dieu is the jewel in the crown. Almost all of the underground area in the city is a labyrinth of underground cellars.

    It seems that the name Beaune comes from Belenos, the Gallic god considered as being similar to the Greek god Apollo by the Romans. The locality must have been a place of worship to this god. Belenos also means shining and Beaune would then come close to a hydronym: clean (water).Les Avaux comes from val, which comes from the Latin word vallis to refer to a small or large dip or hollow.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine is derived from 45-year-old vines, situated in Beaune in the climate called Les Avaux. Facing East and at an altitude of 240 metres, they are planted in a deep clay soil, with a Jurassic limestone substrate.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Beaune Premier Cru

    Climat Aux Cras

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 277 ha 74 a.

    The climat: 4 ha 99 a 61 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Located in the heart of the winegrowing area, Beaune is indisputably its capital. It is home to centuries of history with treasures of architecture and art, among which the 15th century Hôtel-Dieu is the jewel in the crown. Almost all of the underground area in the city is a labyrinth of underground cellars.

    It seems that the name Beaune comes from Belenos, the Gallic god considered as being similar to the Greek god Apollo by the Romans. The locality must have been a place of worship to this god. Belenos also means shining and Beaune would then come close to a hydronym: clean (water).Les Cras comes from the medieval word crai which means stony land.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from 80-year-old vines, located in Beaune within the climate called Aux Cras. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 250 to 300 metres, they are planted in a shallow soil made up of brown limestone, out of altered Ladoix limestone, splitting into 2-cm thick chips, filled with pieces of shells.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Volnay Premier Cru

    Climat Les Lurets

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 132 ha 54 a.

    The climat: 2 ha 07 a 15 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The village is perched on Côte de Beaune. The 14th century church is dedicated to Saint Cyr, one of the youngest christian martyrs, who has since become the patron of the district’s winegrowers.

    Volnay was called Volenay in 1160. It seems that the name comes from a Latin surname Volumnius, but it could also have a Celtic origin with the word vol, which alludes to the idea of round, the village being situated in fact in a corrie.

    Lurets may come from the word larrey stemming from the Latin word latus, which means side of a hill-mountain or slope

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are between 15 and 50 years old, situated South of Volnay in the climate called Les Lurets. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 235 to 240 metres, they are planted in well drained stony soil.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Nuits-Saint-Georges premier Cru

    Climat Aux Boudots

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 136 ha 32 a.

    The climat: 6 ha 30 a 18 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Gui Crescent Fagon was the Sun King’s doctor. In fact, to cure his royal patient of gout, he recommended that Louis XIV drink only red wine from “Vieux Nuits”. The king’s health improved and the renown of Nuits-Saint-Georges continued to flourish.

    Nuits comes from Nuis, which appears to be a surname.

    The name Saint-Georges comes from the IVth century, when it is reported that Philibert de Mollans brought back to Nuits the relics of Georges de Lydda, a Christian martyr. Saint Georges became a patron saint of Burgundy.

    The climat Aux Boudots, located on the slope that joins Nuits-Saint-Georges to Vosne-Romanée, is close to the Premiers Crus of Vosne.It seems that Aux Boudots came from the surname of a well-known owner.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, situated in the northern part of the Nuits-Saint-Georges appellation area at the heart of the climate called Aux Boudots, next to Vosne-Romanée. Facing East/South-East and at an altitude of 255 to 290 metres, they are planted in a well draining brown calcareous clay soil of colluvial origin, derived from altered limestone scree, comprising sharp-edged gravel from Comblanchien limestones.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Gevrey-Chambertin premier Cru

    Climat Lavaut-Saint-Jacques

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 80 ha 52 a.

    The climat: 9 ha 53 a 03 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Winegrowing in Gevrey-Chambertin dates back to Gallo-Roman times as bear witness the many discovered relics. Wine festivals have been held here since the 18th century.

    The name of Chambertin was associated with that of Gevrey in 1847 by a ruling of the king Louis-Philippe.

    It was one of the first villages to sell bottled wines at the beginning of the 1930s.

    Gevrey undoubtedly takes its name from its topography, a gorge coming out of a valley. Gorge comes from the word gaba in Latin and gave means a torrent rushing down a gorge.

    Lavaut takes its name from its location, at the entry of Combe Lavaut. Lavaut comes from La Val, which means dip or hollow. As this climat adjoins Le Clos Saint-Jacques, it chose Saint-Jacques to complete its name.

    The cadastral survey in 1828 showed that the climate included 133 parcels, belonging to 74 estates. The smallest ones represented a mere 25 m2.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are about 50 years old, located in Gevrey-Chambertin in the climate called, Lavaut Saint-Jacques. Facing South/Southeast and at an altitude of 290 to 325 metres, they are planted in a soil, made up of brown limestone, derived from altered chalky-clay and limestone from Premeaux.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Chambolle-Musigny premier Cru

    Climat Aux Échanges

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 55 ha 40 a.

    The climat: 92 a 60 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambolle was an oppidum (a Latin word meaning a fortified town) on the mountain of Grognot, where prehistoric settlement sites were found, revealing numerous pieces of pottery and remaining vestiges of an outer wall. The history of the village is significantly linked to lay-people who worked in the neighbouring abbeys. The village’s expansion occurred when these people decided to settle permanently here. During the XVIth century, Chambolle was part of the monastic jurisdiction of Gilly-les-Cîteaux.

    Chambolle takes its name from the stream named Le Grône, which bubbled loudly after heavy rainfall, hence the term Campus Ebulliens or Champ Bouillant (meaning bubbling field), then mentioned as Chambola in the XIIth century and Cambula during the XIVth century.

    Musigny comes from Musinus, a Gallo-Roman owner.

    It appears that the climat Aux Échanges takes its name from a donation given to the Abbey of Cîteaux, Es Echange, of 12 small plots of land (known in French as ouvrées each one measuring 4.28 acres).

     

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, located next to the locality of Aloxe-Corton on top of Mount Corton. Facing South-East, at an altitude of 280 to 320 metres, they are planted in a brown limestone soil, derived from altered limestone from Ladoix, splitting into 2-cm thick chips, previously used as so-called “lava” tiles on traditional Burgundy roofs.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Corton Le Clos du Roi Grand Cru

     

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 91 ha 53 a.

    The climat: 10 ha 72 a 70 ca.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    The Côte de Beaune begins with the Montagne de Corton.

    Corton comes from the Gallo-Roman period where a rural estate named Curtis was perpetuated by the Franks and subsequently by the monks of Cîteaux.

    Clos du Roi comes from the XVIIIth century, with the French monarchy’s control of wine estates belonging to the Dukes of Burgundy, after the demise of the Téméraire.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, located next to the locality of Aloxe-Corton on top of Mount Corton. Facing South-East, at an altitude of 280 to 320 metres, they are planted in a brown limestone soil, derived from altered limestone from Ladoix, splitting into 2-cm thick chips, previously used as so-called “lava” tiles on traditional Burgundy roofs.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Charmes-Chambertin Grand Cru

     

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 28 ha 43 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambertin takes its name from a Burgonde who owned a field adjoining Clos-de-Bèze: the property took the name Chambertin. The winegrower was gifted and his wine excellent. Everyone spoke about the “Champs de Bertin” (Bertin’s field) when talking about his vineyard. In the XIIIth century, the name Chambertin became a word used frequently in everyday language.

    Charmes comes from a pre-Latin word, calma that became charme, chaux and chaume during the Gallo-Roman and Frank period. In a text written during the XIXth century, the term “friche des charmes” (friche meaning an uncultivated field) was found, hence the name of this climat.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are about 50 years old, situated in the locality of Gevrey-Chambertin in the climate called Charmes-Chambertin. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 250 metres, they are planted in a fine brown limestone soil, out of crinoidal limestone.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Clos de Vougeot

    Grand Cru

    Climat Le Petit Maupertuis

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation: 49 ha 13 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Vougeot owes its renown to the monks of Cîteaux, who came here to establish their production buildings in 1167. The famous Clos-de-Vougeot houses the historical cellar of these Cistercian monks. The mansion was built later, during the Renaissance period. Today it hosts the well-known Wine Brotherhood, the Chevaliers du Tastevin and its ceremonial events.

    Vougeot is the dialectal diminutive of the Vouge, the small river whose source is found in the village and crosses it. It appears that Vouge comes from the Celtic word vidubium which refers to a billhook, or from vidu which means forest.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines that are around 50 years old, situated in the locality of Vougeot, within the climate of Le Petit Maupertuis. Facing South-East and at an altitude of 255 metres, they are planted in a spot where the soil is gravel-laden and quite shallow (about 40 centimetres).

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

  •  

    Chambertin

    Grand Cru

     

    TERRITORY

     

    Area of the appellation:

    13 ha 62 a.

     

     

    History and etymology

     

    Chambertin takes its name from a Burgonde who owned a field adjoining the Clos-de-Bèze: the property took the name of Chambertin. The winegrower was gifted and his wine excellent. Everybody spoke about the “Champs de Bertin” (Bertin’s Field) to refer to his vineyard. In the XIIIth century, Chambertin became a word used frequently in everyday language.

     

     

    The Terroir of our wine

     

    Our wine comes from vines, situated in the locality of Gevrey-Chambertin in the climate called Chambertin. Facing South-East, at an altitude of 270 metres, they are planted in a soil made up of brown limestone, out of altered crinoidal limestone in the lower part of the parcel and ostrea acuminata marls.

     

     

     

     

     

    download the datasheet

     

     

 

Camille Giroud

3 Rue Pierre Joigneaux,

21200 Beaune

 

T. 03 80 22 12 65

contact@camillegiroud.com

 

l'abus d'alcool est dangereux

pour la santé.

Sachez apprécier et consommer

avec modération